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Full text of "Flora Indica Vol-I"

74                                         FLORA  INDICA,
publication, no pains were spared to render them as perfect
an illustration as possible of the flora of their several districts.
For this purpose aberrant forms and varieties were carefully
coDectcd, and a great many specimens were dried of each
species. Great attention was paid to the ticketing of the
specimens, so as to certify the locality and elevation from
which they were obtained. In Sikkim and the Khasia hills
500 large specimens of wood were cut; and Palms, Ptnnlttni,
Bamboos, tree-ferns, etc., were preserved entire; whilst the
flowers and fruits of more than 1000 species were preserved
in spirits. Many notes and dissections were rtlso made on
the spot; and we have the further assistance of a series of
coloured drawings and dissections (of upwards of 1000 spe-
cies) taken by Dr. Hooker from the live plants, and of a valu-
able portfolio of iipwards of 500 drawings of Sikkim plants,
executed at Dorjiling by native artists, under the superin-
tendence and at the expense of our enlightened atid lamented
friend,, the late J. F. Cathcart, Esq. of the Bengal Civil Ser-
vice, very much in furtherance of our botanical labours. This
has been presented to the Kew Museum by the liberality of
his surviving sister.
V. Sketch of'the Meteorology of India.
Climate is an extremely important element in the geogra-
phical distribution of plante; and though it is not necessary
to dwell at any groat length upon the general principles of
Meteorology, an outline of these, aw they arc brought into
operation in India, is requisite for the correct understanding
of the transitions of vegetation in different parts of that
country. Th<5 phenomena of climate in a particular area, arc
well known to depend not only on it$ latitude, but also ou
the configuration of its surface hiid on its pewit;'m relative to
the occau, upon the Direction of .the mountain-chains and
their elevation above ttii Me] #f the sea, and upon the
course of the winds, Temperature and humidity, the two